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Hethersett Open Gardens 2007

The winds died down and sunshine broke through as 13 Hethersett residents opened their gardens to the public on Sunday 1st. 

Balloons and scarecrows indicated the location of the open gardens which were scattered throughout the village and which varied in size, design and contents from a half acre informal plot in Grove Road to a small wildlife garden in Churchfields. 

Well over 100 people, many on foot, took advantage to wander round enjoying the flowers and plants and at last enjoying some Sunday sunshine. 

One gardener, Chris Hovey of Park Drive was claiming a Hethersett record for a gunnera which measures 15ft high and 18 ft wide with individual leaves having a span of well over six feet. 

We think its the biggest gunnera in Hethersett, unless somebody knows different, Chris said adding that the pond at the back of his property used to house fish until an otter decided to visit and eat them. 

Elsewhere there were Victorian walled gardens, gardens laid mainly to lawn and vegetable gardens, all with their own character and lovingly put together by their owners. 

The scarecrows for the event were made by Dr Anne Edwards, who is a member of Hethersett Parish Council. Money raised from the annual event will be split between Hethersett and District Aid in Sickness Fund, Hethersett Ducklings pre-school playgroup and Little Acorns.

Gardens taking part with descriptions were as follows: (details are those printed in the event programme)

Mr Morris - 19 Haconsfield

Quarter acre of sheltered gardens with lawns with trees and mainly evergreen shrubs. Sculptures and water features give a touch of classical elegance. Summer colour is provided by a patio and beds of roses, perennials and annuals.

Mr and Mrs Saunders - 15 Haconsfield

The most striking feature is the Victorian brick wall which used to surround the kitchen garden of the former Hethersett Rectory. The garden consists of lawns, wide borders, a sunken garden and gravel bed with water feature. There is a "wild wood" complete with original boundary railings of the old rectory. These run straight through the middle of an oak and ash tree.

Mr and Mrs Arnall - 9 Haconsfield

Our garden was interesting and well cared for when we moved in but it is now having a structural change with still some way to go. Grasses, climbers and water have been introduced to give another dimension in our aim to develop a colourful four seasons wildlife friendly interest.

Mr and Mrs Talbot - 15 Queen's Road

Our garden is a place for interesting plants and for us to enjoy. There is never a day throughout the year, when something is not in flower. However, as far as possible, plants are selected to have form, shape and colour to provide variety and interest not dependent on flowers. Changes have been made since last year. New plants and planting areas, potting shed and timber pergola which should provide new interest.

Mrs Wheeler - 18 Mill Road

Welcome to my garden. I love it and hoe you will too. Although only six years old these herbaceous borders are maturing well. When Norman's not looking the borders become a little bit bigger to accommodate just one more plant!!

Mr and Mrs Freeman - 27 Mill Road

This medium sized lawned rear garden to an early 1930s house is stocked with shrubs and perennial plants and with pots and baskets. There is a summer house retreat at the bottom end. There are also water features.

The Boyce Family - 49 Mill Road

We have worked hard in our garden since we moved here in 2002, but we still think of it as a work in progress. It is a family garden with mixed planting, a veg patch, food and homes for wildlife and a climbing frame.

Mr and Mrs Hovey - 9 Park Drive

A medium sized garden with a backdrop of tall laurels. Of no particular horticultural merit but possibly the biggest gunnera in Hethersett. We have a fish pond frequented by frogs and otters, but alas now very few fish. We keep a few hens to provide us with our daily egg. It is a simple garden but we like it.

Mr and Mrs Ewart - 16 First Road

After last year's major trees and fences work, come and see what we've managed to do to the most affected areas. Containers and hanging baskets continue to provide portable interest, while the long border and the two arches are filling up nicely.

Mr Gross - 30 St David's Road

This is a cottage garden with rambling and climbing roses, clematis and camellias. The owner, a retired gardener, raises many of the perennials and annuals from seed and cuttings. It is a particularly fine display in the spring. The garden has developed and changed over many years from a virtual wilderness in the seventies. It has been awarded joint first and runner-up in previous years for best garden.

Miss Ford - 11 Lynch Green

Enclosed rear garden with an assortment of unusual plants.

Mr Beckford - 28 Grove Road

Half acre informal garden with a small pond, orchard and some vegetables.

Mrs Mardell - 9 Churchfields

A small garden with a wide range of mature plants. We attract lots of wildlife with over 20 species of birds visiting regularly. The pond attracts frogs and newts while at night there are usually hedgehogs in the borders. There is a bit of room left for us with two seating areas and a small lawn.